22/06/2019

Natural family planning

5/5

About the reviewer

Age
31-35
Time used
8+ years
Had children
No
Height
5'3"/160cm
Weight
60kg - 65kg / 9st 6lb - 10st 3lb
Currently using
No I've stopped using it

Experience

I used the symptothermal method of fertility awareness for about 10 years, which requires daily temperature taking and tracking of cervical mucus changes. I found this to be preferable to using the pill (for me) as it allowed me to understand my body and its natural hormonal cycles. I no longer use it for contraception as my husband and I are currently trying to conceive (using the same method), but never had any issues when we were actively avoiding pregnancy. My suggestion for anyone wanting to pursue this method of contraception is to make sure you follow the rules. There is a pretty high failure rate when the rules are not followed closely (for example, relying on fertility awareness before you have charted/tracked for 3 full cycles, having unprotected sex before ovulation has been confirmed/on days where cervical mucus is observed, not following the protocols for temperature taking, etc.), but the success rate when followed perfectly is 98%. Any side effects I experienced while using this method were more just side effects of my body’s natural hormone production and imbalances (tender breasts after ovulation as a result of estrogen dominance, changes in cervical mucus as a result of allowing my natural hormones to cycle, cramping due to underlying menstrual disorders that were masked while I was on the pill, etc.).

Impact whilst taking

Mood
Very positively
Weight
No change
Periods
No change
Sex drive
Increased sex drive

Side effects whilst taking

No effects

Tender breasts

Womb cramps

Vaginal discharge

Impact after using

Mood
N/A
Weight
N/A
Periods
N/A
Sex drive
N/A

No effects

No effects

No effects

Experience after taking

N/A

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